Gout, hyperuricaemia and crystal-associated disease network (G-CAN) consensus statement regarding labels and definitions of disease states of gout Academic Article Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Endothelial Cells
  • Hematopoietic Stem Cells
  • Placenta
  • Transcriptome

abstract

  • © 2019 Author(s). Objective: There is a lack of standardisation in the terminology used to describe gout. The aim of this project was to develop a consensus statement describing the recommended nomenclature for disease states of gout. Methods: A content analysis of gout-related articles from rheumatology and general internal medicine journals published over a 5-year period identified potential disease states and the labels commonly assigned to them. Based on these findings, experts in gout were invited to participate in a Delphi exercise and face-to-face consensus meeting to reach agreement on disease state labels and definitions. Results: The content analysis identified 13 unique disease states and a total of 63 unique labels. The Delphi exercise (n=76 respondents) and face-to-face meeting (n=35 attendees) established consensus agreement for eight disease state labels and definitions. The agreed labels were as follows: 'asymptomatic hyperuricaemia', ' asymptomatic monosodium urate crystal deposition', ' asymptomatic hyperuricaemia with monosodium urate crystal deposition', ' gout', ' tophaceous gout', ' erosive gout', ' first gout flare' and ' recurrent gout flares'. There was consensus agreement that the label ' gout' should be restricted to current or prior clinically evident disease caused by monosodium urate crystal deposition (gout flare, chronic gouty arthritis or subcutaneous tophus). Conclusion: Consensus agreement has been established for the labels and definitions of eight gout disease states, including ' gout' itself. The Gout, Hyperuricaemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network recommends the use of these labels when describing disease states of gout in research and clinical practice.

authors

publication date

  • January 2019

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-215933

PubMed ID

  • 31501138

Additional Document Info