The NASA twins study: A multidimensional analysis of a year-long human spaceflight Academic Article Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Brain
  • Gestures
  • Imitative Behavior
  • Motor Skills

abstract

  • © 2017 The Authors. To understand the health impact of long-duration spaceflight, one identical twin astronaut was monitored before, during, and after a 1-year mission onboard the International Space Station; his twin served as a genetically matched ground control. Longitudinal assessments identified spaceflight-specific changes, including decreased body mass, telomere elongation, genome instability, carotid artery distension and increased intimamedia thickness, altered ocular structure, transcriptional and metabolic changes, DNA methylation changes in immune and oxidative stress-related pathways, gastrointestinal microbiota alterations, and some cognitive decline postflight. Although average telomere length, global gene expression, and microbiome changes returned to near preflight levels within 6 months after return to Earth, increased numbers of short telomeres were observed and expression of some genes was still disrupted. These multiomic, molecular, physiological, and behavioral datasets provide a valuable roadmap of the putative health risks for future human spaceflight.

authors

publication date

  • January 2019

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1126/science.aau8650

PubMed ID

  • 30975860

Additional Document Info

volume

  • 364

number

  • 6436