Neurosurgery Training Camp for Sub-Internship Preparation: Lessons From the Inaugural Course Academic Article Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Pseudomonas Infections
  • Pseudomonas Vaccines
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

abstract

  • © 2019 Elsevier Inc. Objective: Historically, medical student education in neurological surgery has generally limited student involvement to assisting in research projects with minimal formal clinical exposure before starting sub-internships and application for the neurosurgery match. Consequently, students have generally had little opportunity to acquire exposure to clinical neurosurgery and attain minimal proficiency. A medical student training camp was created to improve the preparation of medical students for the involvement in neurological surgery activities and sub-internships. Methods: A 1-day course was held at Weill Cornell Medicine, which consisted of a series of morning lectures, an interactive resident lunch panel, and afternoon hands-on laboratory sessions. Students completed self-assessment questionnaires regarding their confidence in several areas of clinical neurosurgery before the start of the course and again at its end. Results: A significant increase in self-assessed confidence was observed in all skill areas surveyed. Overall, rising fourth year students who were starting sub-internships in the subsequent weeks reported a substantial increase in their preparedness for the elective rotations in neurosurgery. Conclusions: The preparation of medical students for clinical neurosurgery can be improved. Single-day courses such as the described training camp are an effective method for improving knowledge and skill gaps in medical students entering neurosurgical careers. Initiatives should be developed, in addition to this annual program, to increase the clinical and research skills throughout medical student education.

publication date

  • January 2019

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.03.246

PubMed ID

  • 30947014