Staging Systems for Newly Diagnosed Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The Revised International Staging System Shows the Most Differentiation between Groups Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Depression
  • Depressive Disorder
  • Graft vs Host Disease
  • Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
  • Leukemia
  • Lymphoma
  • Multiple Myeloma
  • Myelodysplastic Syndromes

abstract

  • The Revised International Staging System (R-ISS) and the International Myeloma Working Group 2014 (IMWG 2014) are newer staging systems used to prognosticate multiple myeloma (MM) outcomes. We hypothesized that these would provide better prognostic differentiation for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) compared with ISS. We analyzed the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database from 2008 to 2014 to compare the 3 systems (N = 628) among newly diagnosed MM patients undergoing upfront autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT). The median follow-up of survivors was 48 (range, 3 to 99) months. The R-ISS provided the greatest differentiation between survival curves for each stage (for overall survival [OS], the differentiation was 1.74 using the R-ISS, 1.58 using ISS, and 1.60 using the IMWG 2014) . Univariate analyses at 3years for OS showed R-ISS I at 88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 83% to 93%), II at 75% (95% CI, 70% to 80%), and III at 56% (95% CI, 3% to 69%; P < .001). An integrated Brier score function demonstrated the R-ISS had the best prediction for PFS, though all systems had similar prediction for OS. Among available systems, the R-ISS is the most optimal among available prognostic tools for newly diagnosed MM undergoing AHCT. We recommend that serum lactate dehydrogenase and cytogenetic data be performed on every MM patient at diagnosis to allow accurate prognostication.

authors

publication date

  • January 2018

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.08.013

PubMed ID

  • 30142419

Additional Document Info