Malignant astrocytic tumor progression potentiated by JAK-mediated recruitment of myeloid cells Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Bone Marrow Cells
  • Glioma
  • Myeloid Cells
  • Neovascularization, Pathologic

abstract

  • Purpose: While the tumor microenvironment has been known to play an integral role in tumor progression, the function of nonresident bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) remains to be determined in neurologic tumors. Here we identified the contribution of BMDC recruitment in mediating malignant transformation from low- to high-grade gliomas.Experimental Design: We analyzed human blood and tumor samples from patients with low- and high-grade gliomas. A spontaneous platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) murine glioma model (RCAS) was utilized to recapitulate human disease progression. Levels of CD11b(+)/GR1(+) BMDCs were analyzed at discrete stages of tumor progression. Using bone marrow transplantation, we determined the unique influence of BMDCs in the transition from low- to high-grade glioma. The functional role of these BMDCs was then examined using a JAK 1/2 inhibitor (AZD1480).Results: CD11b(+) myeloid cells were significantly increased during tumor progression in peripheral blood and tumors of glioma patients. Increases in CD11b(+)/GR1(+) cells were observed in murine peripheral blood, bone marrow, and tumors during low-grade to high-grade transformation. Transient blockade of CD11b(+) cell expansion using a JAK 1/2 Inhibitor (AZD1480) impaired mobilization of these cells and was associated with a reduction in tumor volume, maintenance of a low-grade tumor phenotype, and prolongation in survival.Conclusions: We demonstrate that impaired recruitment of CD11b(+) myeloid cells with a JAK1/2 inhibitor inhibits glioma progression in vivo and prolongs survival in a murine glioma model. Clin Cancer Res; 23(12); 3109-19. ©2016 AACR.

publication date

  • June 15, 2017

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-16-1508

PubMed ID

  • 28039266

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 3109

end page

  • 3119

volume

  • 23

number

  • 12