Associations among late chronotype, body mass index and dietary behaviors in young adolescents Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Feeding Behavior
  • Obesity
  • Schools
  • Sleep Deprivation
  • Weight Gain

abstract

  • Later chronotype young adolescents are at risk of increased BMI and poorer dietary behaviors. Although short sleep duration, but not sleep efficiency, was also an independent risk factor for increased BMI, different mechanisms may be driving the late chronotype and shorter sleep duration associations with BMI in this age group. Sleep hygiene education may help adolescents to better understand the impact of sleeping habits on physical health.

publication date

  • January 2015

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1038/ijo.2014.157

PubMed ID

  • 25135376

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 39

end page

  • 44

volume

  • 39

number

  • 1