End-of-life treatment preferences: a key to reducing ethnic/racial disparities in advance care planning? Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Attitude to Death
  • Continental Population Groups
  • Ethnic Groups
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged

MeSH Major

  • Advance Care Planning
  • Healthcare Disparities
  • Neoplasms
  • Patient Preference
  • Terminal Care

abstract

  • The objective of this study was to identify targets for interventions to reduce end-of-life care disparities among patients with advanced cancer. To do this, the authors evaluated the degree to which end-of-life care values and preferences are associated with advance care planning within racial/ethnic minority groups. The Coping with Cancer study recruited patients with advanced cancer from outpatient clinics in 5 states from 2002 to 2008. Then, the rates of 1 type of advance care planning-do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders-reported at baseline interviews by 606 patients were investigated. Bivariate tests determined associations among DNR order completion, religious values, and treatment preferences within racial/ethnic groups. Non-Latino white patients were significantly more likely to have a DNR order (45%) than black (25%) and Latino (20%) patients (P<.001). A preference against specific life-prolonging treatment (eg, chemotherapy, ventilation) was the only factor significantly associated with higher DNR order likelihood in each group, with non-Latino white patients more likely than Latino or black patients to express preferences against life-prolonging care (eg, 26% of non-Latino white patients, 46% of black patients, and 41% of Latino patients wanted a feeding tube if it would extend life for 1 more day; P<.001). Preferences against life-prolonging care differ dramatically by race/ethnicity, but they have a uniform significant association with DNR order completion rates across racial/ethnic groups of patients with advanced cancer. Advance care planning interventions that target preferences associated with DNR orders across racial/ethnic groups may reach a broad patient population and reduce end-of-life care disparities. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

publication date

  • December 15, 2014

has subject area

  • Adult
  • Advance Care Planning
  • Aged
  • Attitude to Death
  • Continental Population Groups
  • Ethnic Groups
  • Female
  • Healthcare Disparities
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasms
  • Patient Preference
  • Terminal Care

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC4257859

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/cncr.28970

PubMed ID

  • 25145489

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 3981

end page

  • 3986

volume

  • 120

number

  • 24