Perceptions of health status and survival in patients with metastatic lung cancer. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Aged
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Prognosis
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Risk Factors
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • Survival Analysis
  • Terminal Care
  • United States

MeSH Major

  • Attitude to Health
  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung
  • Health Status
  • Lung Neoplasms
  • Terminally Ill

abstract

  • Cognitive awareness of having a terminal illness is associated with critical treatment decisions and outcomes. However, little is known about the course and correlates of such perceptions in patients with metastatic lung cancer. We explored changes in perceptions of health status over time in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether awareness of having a terminal illness was associated with survival. For this secondary analysis of clinical trial data, we assessed perceptions of health status at baseline, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. At each time point, patients with metastatic NSCLC completed a measure of quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Trial Outcome Index) and also reported whether they were "relatively healthy," "seriously but not terminally ill," or "seriously and terminally ill." We reviewed patients' medical records to gather data on clinical characteristics. At baseline, 49.3% reported being relatively healthy, whereas the remainder self-identified as seriously but not terminally ill (38.2%) or seriously and terminally ill (12.5%). Over multiple assessments, 24.8% reported having a terminal illness. Adjusting for known prognostic factors, patients' time-varying perceptions of health status remained a significant predictor of survival (hazards ratio = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.07-2.09, P = 0.019). A minority of patients with metastatic NSCLC acknowledged being terminally ill. Those reporting that they were seriously and terminally ill had shorter survival compared with those who did not consider themselves terminally ill, even after adjusting for decline in physical and functional well-being. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • October 2014

has subject area

  • Aged
  • Attitude to Health
  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung
  • Female
  • Health Status
  • Humans
  • Lung Neoplasms
  • Male
  • Prognosis
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Risk Factors
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • Survival Analysis
  • Terminal Care
  • Terminally Ill
  • United States

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2013.10.016

PubMed ID

  • 24680623

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 548

end page

  • 557

volume

  • 48

number

  • 4