Autonomic dysfunction in isolated rapid eye movement sleep without atonia. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged

MeSH Major

  • Heart Rate
  • Polysomnography
  • REM Sleep Behavior Disorder
  • Sleep, REM

abstract

  • Autonomic dysfunction has been demonstrated in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder utilizing heart rate variability parameters. We hypothesized that isolated rapid eye movement sleep without atonia is similarly associated with autonomic dysfunction as demonstrated by a reduction in heart rate variability. An evaluation of 120 records demonstrating rapid eye movement sleep without atonia during polysomnography was performed. Many (n=99) were discarded owing to factors potentially affecting heart rate variability. The remaining 21 records were matched with 21 records of patients demonstrating normal REM atonia, and subjected to electrocardiogram analysis. The parameters measured included R to R interval (RR) length, RR standard deviation, heart rate variability power, and very low frequency, low frequency, and high frequency bands. Autonomic dysfunction was seen in patients with isolated rapid eye movement sleep without atonia as denoted by a reduction in heart rate variability compared to those with normal REM atonia. Significant differences between the groups were demonstrated in RR standard deviation (mean difference=0.1502 ± 0.317, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=0.006, 0.295, p=0.042), heart rate variability power (mean difference=0.3005 ± 0.635, 95% CI=0.011, 0.589, p=0.042), and the low frequency band (mean difference=0.3166 ± 0.616 ms(2), 95% CI=0.036, 0.597, p=0.029), and a borderline significant reduction in the high frequency band (mean difference=0.3121 ± 0.686 ms(2), 95% CI=0.000, 0.624, p=0.050). Our data confirms the hypothesis that heart rate variability is reduced in patients with isolated rapid eye movement sleep without atonia. The values obtained are consistent with previous findings in rapid eye movement behavior sleep disorder patients. This is the first report of autonomic dysfunction in isolated rapid eye movement sleep without atonia, revealing the need for further evaluation of the clinical significance and potential implications of this finding. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • April 2015

has subject area

  • Adult
  • Female
  • Heart Rate
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Polysomnography
  • REM Sleep Behavior Disorder
  • Sleep, REM

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.clinph.2014.07.015

PubMed ID

  • 25193749

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 731

end page

  • 735

volume

  • 126

number

  • 4