Integration of geriatric mental health screening into a primary care practice: a patient satisfaction survey. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Female
  • Geriatric Assessment
  • Humans
  • Male

MeSH Major

  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
  • Depressive Disorder
  • Health Services for the Aged
  • Mass Screening
  • Mental Health Services
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Primary Health Care

abstract

  • Colocation of mental health screening, assessment, and treatment in primary care reduces stigma, improves access, and increases coordination of care between mental health and primary care providers. However, little information exists regarding older adults' attitudes about screening for mental health problems in primary care. The objective of this study was to evaluate older primary care patients' acceptance of and satisfaction with screening for depression and anxiety. The study was conducted at an urban, academically affiliated primary care practice serving older adults. Study patients (N = 107) were screened for depression/anxiety and underwent a post-screening survey/interview to assess their reactions to the screening experience. Most patients (88.6%) found the length of the screening to be "just right." A majority found the screening questions somewhat or very acceptable (73.4%) and not at all difficult (81.9%). Most participants did not find the questions stressful (84.9%) or intrusive (91.5%); and a majority were not at all embarrassed (93.4%), upset (93.4%), or uncomfortable (88.8%) during the screening process. When asked about frequency of screening, most patients (72.4%) desired screening for depression/anxiety yearly or more. Of the 79 patients who had spoken with their physicians about mental health during the visit, 89.8% reported that it was easy or very easy to talk with their physicians about depression/anxiety. Multivariate results showed that patients with higher anxiety had a lower positive reaction to the screen when controlling for gender, age, and patient-physician communication. These results demonstrate strong patient support for depression and anxiety screening in primary care. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

publication date

  • May 2015

has subject area

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
  • Depressive Disorder
  • Female
  • Geriatric Assessment
  • Health Services for the Aged
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mass Screening
  • Mental Health Services
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Primary Health Care

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC4363083

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/gps.4180

PubMed ID

  • 25132003

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 539

end page

  • 546

volume

  • 30

number

  • 5