A randomised controlled trial on the effect of mask choice on residual respiratory events with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Polysomnography
  • Sleep Apnea, Obstructive
  • Treatment Outcome

MeSH Major

  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
  • Masks

abstract

  • It has been found that mask style can affect the amount of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) required to reduce an apnoea/hyponoea index (AHI) to < 5/h on a titration study. However, it was not previously known whether switching from one CPAP mask style to another post titration could affect the residual AHI with CPAP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in residual AHI with CPAP treatment between oronasal and nasal masks. Twenty-one subjects (age mean (M)=62.9, body mass index (BMI) M=29.6 kg/m2) were randomised (14 subjects completed the protocol) to undergo an in-laboratory CPAP titration with either a nasal mask or an oronasal mask. Subjects were then assigned this mask for 3weeks of at-home CPAP use with the optimal treatment pressure determined on the laboratory study (CPAP M=8.4 cm of H2O). At the end of this 3-week period, data were collected from the CPAP machine and the subject was given the other mask to use with the same CPAP settings for the next 3weeks at home (if the nasal mask was given initially, the oronasal one was given later and vice versa). On completion of the second 3-week period, data on residual AHI were again collected and compared with the first 3-week period on CPAP. A Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test (two-tailed) revealed that residual AHI with CPAP treatment was significantly higher with the oronasal compared with the nasal mask (z = -3.296, p<0.001). All 14 subjects had a higher residual AHI with the oronasal versus nasal mask, and 50% of the subjects had a residual AHI >10/h in the oronasal mask condition, even though all of these subjects were titrated to an AHI of < 5/h in the laboratory. A higher residual AHI was seen in all patients with the use of an oronasal mask compared with a nasal mask. Switching to an oronasal mask post titration results in an increase in residual AHI with CPAP treatment, and pressure adjustment may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • June 2014

has subject area

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Masks
  • Middle Aged
  • Polysomnography
  • Sleep Apnea, Obstructive
  • Treatment Outcome

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.sleep.2014.01.011

PubMed ID

  • 24831252

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 619

end page

  • 624

volume

  • 15

number

  • 6