Trial Watch: Tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy Review uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Carrier Proteins
  • Immunity, Innate
  • Inflammasomes
  • Mitochondria

abstract

  • In 1997, for the first time in history, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), i.e., the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of mAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has not stopped to expand, nowadays encompassing a stunning amount of 15 distinct molecules. This therapeutic armamentarium includes mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens, as well as molecules that interfere with tumor-stroma interactions or exert direct immunostimulatory effects. These three classes of mAbs exert antineoplastic activity via distinct mechanisms, which may or may not involve immune effectors other than the mAbs themselves. In previous issues of OncoImmunology, we provided a brief scientific background to the use of mAbs, all types confounded, in cancer therapy, and discussed the results of recent clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of this approach. Here, we focus on mAbs that primarily target malignant cells or their interactions with stromal components, as opposed to mAbs that mediate antineoplastic effects by activating the immune system. In particular, we discuss relevant clinical findings that have been published during the last 13 months as well as clinical trials that have been launched in the same period to investigate the therapeutic profile of hitherto investigational tumor-targeting mAbs.

publication date

  • January 2014

Research

keywords

  • Review

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC3937194

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.4161/onci.27048

PubMed ID

  • 24605265

Additional Document Info

start page

  • e27048

volume

  • 3

number

  • 1