Development and validation of a celiac disease quality of life instrument for North American children Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Activities of Daily Living
  • Celiac Disease
  • Quality of Life
  • Surveys and Questionnaires

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE:: Given the social constraints imposed by a gluten-free diet, it can be hypothesized that children with celiac disease (CD) living in the United States have a reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL); however, there is no validated CD-specific HRQOL instrument for children living in the United States. The goals of this study were to develop and validate a CD-specific HRQOL instrument for children 8 to 18 years of age with CD and to report HRQOL in these children using both generic- and disease-specific instruments. METHODS:: This was a prospective study using focus group methodology to develop a CD-specific HRQOL instrument that was then administered to children 8 to 18 years of age with CD living throughout the United States. Instrument validation methods included construct, convergent, and divergent validities. RESULTS:: Two instruments were developed: CD-specific pediatric HRQOL instrument (CDPQOL) 8 to 12 and CDPQOL 13 to 18. A total of 181 children with CD completed the CDPQOL as well as a comparator generic instrument. Exploratory factor analysis restructured the CDPQOL and reduced the total number of items. The CDPQOL showed a moderate agreement with the Psychosocial dimensions of the generic instrument confirming convergent validity and low-to-moderate agreement with the Physical Health Summary dimension of the generic instrument confirming divergent validity. CONCLUSIONS:: The CDPQOL, consisting of 13 to 17 questions, is a validated instrument for the measurement of HRQOL in children 8 to 18 years of age with CD living in the United States. Copyright © 2013 by European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

publication date

  • October 2013

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/MPG.0b013e31829b68a1

PubMed ID

  • 23689265

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 477

end page

  • 486

volume

  • 57

number

  • 4