Patient-oncologist alliance, psychosocial well-being, and treatment adherence among young adults with advanced cancer. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Young Adult

MeSH Major

  • Neoplasms
  • Patient Compliance
  • Physician-Patient Relations

abstract

  • Patients who develop a strong alliance with their health care providers have been shown to have higher levels of psychosocial well-being and rates of treatment adherence. Young adults with cancer have lower levels of psychosocial well-being and treatment adherence relative to patients with cancer in other age groups. This study sought to evaluate the relationships between the patient-oncologist alliance, psychosocial well-being, and treatment adherence in young adults with advanced cancer. Ninety-five young adults (age 20 to 40 years) with advanced cancer were administered measures of alliance, psychosocial well-being, willingness to adhere to treatment, and treatment adherence. Relationships between alliance and psychosocial well-being were examined bivariately. Multiple linear regression models examined the relationship between alliance and adherence, controlling for confounding influences (eg, psychosocial well-being). Alliance was significantly (P ≤ .01) and positively associated with greater perceived social support and less severe illness-related grief. After controlling for significant confounding influences (ie, metastases, appraised support, and grief), alliance remained significantly (P ≤ .01) associated with greater willingness to adhere to treatment and greater adherence to oral medication. By developing a strong alliance, oncologists may enhance psychosocial well-being and increase treatment adherence in young adult patients with advanced cancer.

publication date

  • May 1, 2013

has subject area

  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Neoplasms
  • Patient Compliance
  • Physician-Patient Relations
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Young Adult

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC4878006

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1200/JCO.2012.46.7993

PubMed ID

  • 23530105

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 1683

end page

  • 1689

volume

  • 31

number

  • 13