Associations between cognitive impairment in advanced cancer patients and psychiatric disorders in their caregivers. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Female
  • Grief
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mental Health
  • Middle Aged
  • Risk Factors
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Stress, Psychological
  • Surveys and Questionnaires

MeSH Major

  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Caregivers
  • Cognitive Dysfunction
  • Mental Disorders
  • Neoplasms

abstract

  • This study examined whether cognitive impairment in advanced cancer patients is associated with a heightened frequency of psychiatric disorders in their primary caregivers. Three hundred fifty-six patient-caregiver dyads were interviewed and administered the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire and the Structured Clinical Interview of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition approximately 3.4 months before the patient's death. The Structured Clinical Interview of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition was administered to caregivers again approximately 6 months after the patient's death. Forty-six (12.9%) patients displayed signs of mild cognitive impairment at the baseline interview. After adjustment for relevant confounders, patient cognitive impairment was significantly associated with caregiver pre-loss major depressive disorder [OR 6.88 (95% CI 1.32-35.92); p = 0.02], without associated increases in suicidality. There were no significant associations between patient cognitive impairment and caregiver pre-loss generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, or grief. Likewise, there were no significant associations between patient cognitive impairment and caregiver post-loss psychiatric disorders, but caregivers of cognitively impaired patients appeared to be less satisfied with the patient's manner of death (p = 0.01). Caregivers of cognitively impaired advanced cancer patients appear at heightened risk of major depression that resolves after the patient's death. Further study with a larger sample and more sensitive longitudinal cognitive measures is indicated. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

publication date

  • April 2013

has subject area

  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Caregivers
  • Cognitive Dysfunction
  • Female
  • Grief
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mental Disorders
  • Mental Health
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasms
  • Risk Factors
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Stress, Psychological
  • Surveys and Questionnaires

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC3391537

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/pon.3076

PubMed ID

  • 22451155

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 952

end page

  • 955

volume

  • 22

number

  • 4