Increasing treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis is not determined by the disease activity score but by physician global assessment: results from the CATCH study. Academic Article Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Canada
  • Cohort Studies
  • Decision Making
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prospective Studies
  • Regression Analysis

MeSH Major

  • Antirheumatic Agents
  • Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  • Disability Evaluation
  • Physicians
  • Severity of Illness Index

abstract

  • To determine the factors most strongly associated with an increase in therapy of early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA). Data from the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) were included if the patient had ≥ 2 visits and baseline and 6 months data. A regression analysis was done to determine factors associated with treatment intensification. Of 1145 patients with ERA, 790 met inclusion criteria; mean age was 53.4 years (SD 14.7), mean disease duration 6.1 months (SD 2.8), 75% were female, baseline Disease Activity Score-28 (DAS28) was 4.7 (SD 1.8) and 2.9 (SD 1.8) at 6 months for included patients. Univariate factors for intensifying treatment were physician global assessment (MDGA; OR 7.8 and OR 7.4 at 3 and 6 months, respectively, p < 0.0005), swollen joint count (SJC; OR 4.7 and OR 7.3 at 3 and 6 months, p < 0.0005), and DAS28 (OR 3.0 and OR 4.6 at 3 and 6 months, p < 0.0005). In the regression model only MDGA was strongly associated with treatment intensification (OR 1.5 and OR 1.2 at 3 and 6 months, p < 0.0005); DAS28 was not consistently predictive (OR 1.0, p = 0.987, and OR 1.2, p = 0.023, at 3 and 6 months). DAS28 was the reason for treatment intensification 2.3% of the time, compared to 51.7% for SJC, 49.9% for tender joint count, and 23.8% for MDGA. For the same SJC, larger joint involvement was more likely to influence treatment than small joints at 3 months (OR 1.4, p = 0.027). MDGA was strongly associated with an increase in treatment at 3 and 6 months in ERA, whereas DAS28 was not. Physicians rarely stated that DAS28 was the reason for increasing treatment.

publication date

  • November 2012

has subject area

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Antirheumatic Agents
  • Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  • Canada
  • Cohort Studies
  • Decision Making
  • Disability Evaluation
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Physicians
  • Prospective Studies
  • Regression Analysis
  • Severity of Illness Index

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article
  • Multicenter Study

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3899/jrheum.120520

PubMed ID

  • 22942265

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 2081

end page

  • 2087

volume

  • 39

number

  • 11