Measuring psychosocial distress and parenting concerns among adults with cancer: the Parenting Concerns Questionnaire. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasm Metastasis
  • Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
  • Psychometrics
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Young Adult

MeSH Major

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Neoplasms
  • Parenting
  • Quality of Life

abstract

  • A 2-phase, mixed methods study was conducted to develop a Parenting Concerns Questionnaire (PCQ) for adults with cancer. Limited information about this area of psychosocial distress highlights the need for a measurement tool that can identify adult oncology patients with heightened parenting concerns who could benefit from additional intervention. Telephone focus groups were conducted with 16 oncology patients who had children 18 years old and younger. Group interview transcripts were analyzed to generate qualitative themes and candidate items for the PCQ. A 38-item version of the questionnaire was completed by 173 oncology outpatients who had children 18 years old and under. Participants also completed the Distress Thermometer, HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and FACT-G (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General). Exploratory factor analyses revealed the emergence of 3 subscales of 5 items each, yielding a 15-item questionnaire. Associations between total PCQ scores, standardized measures of distress, depression, anxiety, quality of life, and demographic and illness characteristics were examined. The 15-item PCQ demonstrates good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .83). PCQ scores were significantly associated (P < .01) with standardized measures of psychosocial distress (Distress Thermometer, HADS, and FACT-G) in the expected directions. Higher PCQ scores were associated with female sex, single parenthood, metastatic or recurrent cancer, subjective understanding of incurable disease, comorbid chronic health condition, and current mental health treatment. The PCQ proved a reliable and valid measure of parenting distress among cancer patients, and thus merits further study. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

publication date

  • November 15, 2012

has subject area

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Anxiety
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Depression
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasm Metastasis
  • Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
  • Neoplasms
  • Parenting
  • Psychometrics
  • Quality of Life
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Young Adult

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC3422599

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/cncr.27572

PubMed ID

  • 22517236

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 5671

end page

  • 5678

volume

  • 118

number

  • 22