Religious coping and behavioral disengagement: opposing influences on advance care planning and receipt of intensive care near death. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Attitude to Death
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Life Support Care
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prospective Studies
  • Quality of Life
  • Resuscitation Orders
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Socioeconomic Factors

MeSH Major

  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Advance Care Planning
  • Advance Directives
  • Neoplasms
  • Spirituality
  • Terminal Care

abstract

  • This study examines the relationships between methods of coping with advanced cancer, completion of advance care directives, and receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. The analysis is based on a sample of 345 patients interviewed between January 1, 2003, and August 31, 2007, and followed until death as part of the Coping with Cancer Study, an NCI/NIMH-funded, multi-site, prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of patients with advanced cancer. The Brief COPE was used to assess active coping, use of emotional-support, and behavioral disengagement. The Brief RCOPE was used to assess positive and negative religious coping. The main outcome was intensive, life-prolonging care near death, defined as receipt of ventilation or resuscitation in the last week of life. Positive religious coping was associated with lower rates of having a living will (AOR = 0.39, p = 0.003) and predicted higher rates of intensive, life-prolonging care near death (AOR, 5.43; p<0.001), adjusting for other coping methods and potential socio-demographic and health status confounds. Behavioral disengagement was associated with higher rates of DNR order completion (AOR, 2.78; p = 0.003) and predicted lower rates of intensive life-prolonging care near death (AOR, 0.20; p = 0.036). Not having a living will partially mediate the influence of positive religious coping on receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. Positive religious coping and behavioral disengagement are important determinants of completion of advance care directives and receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

publication date

  • July 2012

has subject area

  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Adult
  • Advance Care Planning
  • Advance Directives
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Attitude to Death
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Life Support Care
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasms
  • Prospective Studies
  • Quality of Life
  • Resuscitation Orders
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Spirituality
  • Terminal Care

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC3134563

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/pon.1967

PubMed ID

  • 21449037

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 714

end page

  • 723

volume

  • 21

number

  • 7