Participatory adaptation of an evidence-based, arthritis self-management program: making changes to improve program fit. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • African Americans
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Female
  • Health Services Needs and Demand
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Male
  • Organizational Innovation
  • Patient Preference
  • Self Efficacy

MeSH Major

  • Arthritis
  • Community-Based Participatory Research
  • Community-Institutional Relations
  • Evidence-Based Medicine
  • Program Evaluation
  • Self Care

abstract

  • We employed community-based participatory research techniques to adapt an evidence-based self-management program called the Arthritis Self-Help Program for older African American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white adults. Participants and instructors provided multiple recommendations for program change (including content additions or augmentations as well as changes in program delivery) in telephone interviews and focus groups. Recommendations were implemented through a collaborative process involving diverse stakeholders. Changes implemented respond to the preferences and needs of participants, as well as the strengths and constraints of program instructors and host sites. Improved fit for participants may extend the program's reach and effectiveness for older adults of color. In addition, the adapted Arthritis Self-Help Program may make the program more feasible and therefore sustainable for the host sites.

publication date

  • July 2012
  • September 2012

has subject area

  • African Americans
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Arthritis
  • Community-Based Participatory Research
  • Community-Institutional Relations
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Evidence-Based Medicine
  • Female
  • Health Services Needs and Demand
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Male
  • Organizational Innovation
  • Patient Preference
  • Program Evaluation
  • Self Care
  • Self Efficacy

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC3730496

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/FCH.0b013e318250bd5f

PubMed ID

  • 22617414

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 236

end page

  • 245

volume

  • 35

number

  • 3