Predictors of oxidative stress in heart failure patients with Cheyne-Stokes respiration. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Aged
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Polysomnography
  • Prognosis
  • Reactive Oxygen Species
  • Reference Values
  • Risk Factors

MeSH Major

  • Cheyne-Stokes Respiration
  • Heart Failure
  • Oxidative Stress

abstract

  • Cheyne-Stokes respiration during sleep is associated with increased mortality in heart failure. The magnitude of oxidative stress is a marker of disease severity and a valuable predictor of mortality in heart failure. Increased oxidative stress associated with periodic breathing during Cheyne-Stokes respiration may mediate increased mortality in these patients. We hypothesized that the presence of Cheyne-Stokes respiration is associated with oxidative stress by increasing the formation of reactive oxygen species in patients with heart failure. Twenty-three patients with heart failure [left ventricular ejection fraction 30.2 ± 9% (mean ± standard deviation)] and 11 healthy controls underwent nocturnal polysomnography. Subjects with obstructive sleep apnea were excluded. The majority (88%) of patients with heart failure had Cheyne-Stokes respiration during sleep. The intensity of oxidative stress in neutrophils was greater in patients with heart failure (4,218 ± 1,706 mean fluorescence intensity/cell vs. 1,003 ± 348 for controls, p < 0.001) and correlated with the duration of Cheyne-Stokes respiration. Oxidative stress was negatively correlated with SaO(2) nadir during sleep (r = -0.43, p = 0.039). The duration of Cheyne-Stokes respiration predicted severity of oxidative stress in patients with heart failure (beta = 483 mean fluorescence intensity/cell, p < 0.02). Levels of oxidative stress are increased in patients with heart failure and Cheyne-Stokes respiration during sleep compared with healthy controls. The duration of Cheyne-Stokes respiration predicts the magnitude of oxidative stress in heart failure. Increased oxidative stress may mediate increased mortality associated with Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients with heart failure.

publication date

  • December 2011

has subject area

  • Aged
  • Cheyne-Stokes Respiration
  • Female
  • Heart Failure
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Oxidative Stress
  • Polysomnography
  • Prognosis
  • Reactive Oxygen Species
  • Reference Values
  • Risk Factors

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s11325-010-0444-2

PubMed ID

  • 21103943

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 827

end page

  • 835

volume

  • 15

number

  • 4