Beta-zone parapapillary atrophy and multifocal visual evoked potentials in eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Evoked Potentials, Visual
  • Glaucoma
  • Optic Atrophy
  • Optic Nerve Diseases

abstract

  • We investigated changes in multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) responses due to beta-zone parapapillary atrophy (ßPPA). Patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) with or without standard achromatic perimetry (SAP) abnormalities were referred for mfVEP testing during a 2-year period. Eyes with good quality optic disc stereophotographs and reliable SAP results were included. The mfVEP monocular mean latency delays (ms) and amplitudes (SNR) were analyzed. Age, SAP mean deviation (MD), pattern standard deviation (PSD), and spherical equivalent (SE) were analyzed in the multivariate model. Generalized estimated equations were used for comparisons between groups after adjusting for inter-eye associations. Of 394 eyes of 200 patients, 223 (57%) had ßPPA. The ßPPA eyes were older (59.6 ± 13.7 vs. 56.5 ± 13.7 year, P = 0.02), more myopic (-4.0 ± 3.5 vs. -1.3 ± 3.5 D, P < 0.01), and had poorer SAP scores (MD: -4.9 ± 5.2 vs. -2.6 ± 5.2 dB, P < 0.01; PSD: 4.3 ± 2.9 vs. 2.5 ± 3.0 dB, P < 0.01). By univariate analysis, mean latencies were longer in ßPPA eyes (6.1 ± 5.3 vs. 4.0 ± 5.5 ms, P < 0.01). After adjusting for differences in SE, age, and SAP MD, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.09). ßPPA eyes had lower amplitude log SNR (0.49 ± 0.16 vs. 0.56 ± 0.15, P < 0.01), which lost significance (P = 0.51) after adjusting for MD and PSD. Although eyes with ßPPA had significantly lower amplitudes and prolonged latencies than eyes without ßPPA, these differences were attributable to differences in SAP severity, age, and refractive error. Thus, ßPPA does not appear to be an independent factor affecting mfVEP responses in eyes with GON.

publication date

  • August 2011

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC4469993

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s10633-011-9280-3

PubMed ID

  • 21735265

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 43

end page

  • 50

volume

  • 123

number

  • 1