Risk of heart failure with human immunodeficiency virus in the absence of prior diagnosis of coronary heart disease Academic Article Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Arcobacter
  • Bacteremia
  • Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
  • Immunocompromised Host

abstract

  • Background: Whether human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a risk factor for heart failure (HF) is not clear. The presence of coronary heart disease and alcohol consumption in this population may confound this association. Methods: To determine whether HIV infection is a risk factor for incident HF, we conducted a population based, retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected and HIV uninfected veterans enrolled in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC) and the 1999 Large Health Study of Veteran Enrollees (LHS) from January 1, 2000, to July 31, 2007. Results: There were 8486 participants (28.2% HIV infected) enrolled in the VACS-VC who also participated in the 1999 LHS. During the median 7.3 years of follow-up, 286 incident HF events occurred. Age- and race/ethnicity-adjusted HF rates among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected veterans were 7.12 (95% confidence interval [CI],6.90-7.34) and 4.82 (95% CI, 4.72-4.91) per 1000 person-years, respectively. Compared with HIV uninfected veterans, those who were HIV infected had an increased risk of HF (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.81; 95% CI, 1.39-2.36). This association persisted among veterans who did not have a coronary heart disease event or a diagnosis related to alcohol abuse or dependence before the incident HF event (adjusted HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.29-2.98). Compared with HIV-uninfected veterans, those who were HIV infected with a baseline Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA level of 500 or more copies/mL had a higher risk of HF (adjusted HR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.57-3.32), while those with baseline and a recent HIV-1 RNA level less than 500 copies/mL did not (adjusted HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.64-1.89; P<.001 for comparison between high and low HIV-1 RNA groups). Conclusions: Our data suggest that HIV infection is a risk factor for HF. Ongoing viral replication is associated with a higher risk of developing HF. ©2011 American Medical Association.

publication date

  • April 25, 2011

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1001/archinternmed.2011.151

PubMed ID

  • 21518940

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 737

end page

  • 743

volume

  • 171

number

  • 8