Autoimmune disease and the human metagenome Chapter uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Movement
  • Prostate
  • Prostatic Neoplasms
  • Rectum

abstract

  • © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011. All rights reserved.The prevailing theory of autoimmune disease, that the body creates autoantibodies that attack self, was developed during an era when culture-based methods vastly underestimated the number of microbes capable of persisting in and on Homo sapiens. Thanks to the advent of culture-independent tools, the human body is now known to harbor billions of microbes whose collective genomes work in concert with the human genome. Thus, the human genome can no longer be studied in isolation. Some of these microbes persist by slowing the activity of the vitamin D receptor nuclear receptor, affecting the expression of endogenous antimicrobials and other key components of the innate immune system. It seems that bacteria that cause autoimmune disease accumulate over a lifetime, with individuals picking up pathogens with greater ease over time, as the immune response becomes increasingly compromised. Any one autoimmune disease is likely due to many different microbes within the metagenomic microbiota. This helps explain the high levels of comorbidity observed among patients with autoimmune conditions. What are commonly believed to be autoantibodies may instead be created in response to this metagenomic microbiota when the adaptive immune system is forced to deal with disintegration of infected cells. Similarly, haplotypes associated with autoimmune conditions vary widely among individuals and populations. They are more suggestive of a regional infectious model rather than a model in which an illness is caused by inherited variation of HLA haplotypes

publication date

  • January 2011

Research

keywords

  • Book Chapter

Identity

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/978-1-4419-7089-3_12

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 231

end page

  • 275