Genetic variation in RNASEL associated with prostate cancer risk and progression Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Endoribonucleases
  • Mutation, Missense
  • Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
  • Prostatic Neoplasms

abstract

  • Variation in genes contributing to the host immune response may mediate the relationship between inflammation and prostate carcinogenesis. RNASEL at chromosome 1q25 encodes ribonuclease L, part of the interferon-mediated immune response to viral infection. We therefore investigated the association between variation in RNASEL and prostate cancer risk and progression in a study of 1286 cases and 1264 controls nested within the prospective Physicians' Health Study. Eleven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using the web-based 'Tagger' in the HapMap CEPH panel (Utah residents of Northern and Western European Ancestry). Unconditional logistic regression models assessed the relationship between each SNP and incident advanced stage (T(3)/T(4), T(0)-T(4)/M(1) and lethal disease) and high Gleason grade (>/=7) prostate cancer. Further analyses were stratified by calendar year of diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models examined the relationship between genotype and prostate cancer-specific survival. We also explored associations between genotype and serum inflammatory biomarkers interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 2 using linear regression. Individuals homozygous for the variant allele of rs12757998 had an increased risk of prostate cancer [AA versus GG; odds ratio (OR): 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-2.25), and more specifically, high-grade tumors (OR: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.25-2.89). The same genotype was associated with increased CRP (P = 0.02) and IL-6 (P = 0.05) levels. Missense mutations R462Q and D541E were associated with an increased risk of advanced stage disease only in the pre-prostate-specific antigen era. There were no significant associations with survival. The results of this study support a link between RNASEL and prostate cancer and suggest that the association may be mediated through inflammation. These novel findings warrant replication in future studies.

publication date

  • June 24, 2010

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC2930803

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1093/carcin/bgq132

PubMed ID

  • 20576793

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 1597

end page

  • 603

volume

  • 31

number

  • 9