Associations between NBS1 polymorphisms, haplotypes and smoking-related cancers Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Cell Cycle Proteins
  • Haplotypes
  • Neoplasms
  • Nuclear Proteins
  • Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
  • Smoking

abstract

  • Constituents of tobacco smoke can cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), leading to tumorigenesis. The NBS1 gene product is a vital component in DSB detection and repair, thus genetic variations may influence cancer development. We examined the associations between NBS1 polymorphisms and haplotypes and newly incident smoking-related cancers in three case-control studies (Los Angeles: 611 lung and 601 upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancer cases and 1040 controls; Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center: 227 bladder cancer cases and 211 controls and Taixing, China: 218 esophagus, 206 stomach, 204 liver cancer cases and 415 controls). rs1061302 was associated with cancers of the lung [adjusted odds ratio (OR(adj)) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2, 2.4], larynx (OR(adj) = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.32, 0.97) and liver (OR(adj) = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.9). Additionally, positive associations were found for rs709816 with bladder cancer (OR(adj) = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.4, 12) and rs1063054 with lung cancer (OR(adj) = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.3). Some associations in lung and stomach cancers varied with smoking status. CAC haplotype was positively associated with smoking-related cancers: lung (OR(adj) = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.9) and UADT (OR(adj) = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1, 3.7), specifically, oropharynx (OR(adj) = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.0, 4.2) and larynx (OR(adj) = 4.8, 95% CI: 1.7, 14). Bayesian false-discovery probabilities were calculated to assess Type I error. It appears that NBS1 polymorphisms and haplotypes may be associated with smoking-related cancers and that these associations may differ by smoking status. Our findings also suggest that single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in the binding region of the MRE-RAD50-NBS1 complex or microRNA targeted pathways may influence tumor development. These hypotheses should be further examined in functional studies.

publication date

  • May 17, 2010

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC2893801

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1093/carcin/bgq096

PubMed ID

  • 20478923

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 1264

end page

  • 71

volume

  • 31

number

  • 7