Impact of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography Findings on the Medical Treatment and Control of Coronary Artery Disease and Its Risk Factors Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Coronary Angiography
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • Tomography, X-Ray Computed

abstract

  • Although coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has high diagnostic accuracy and increasing evidence of prognostic value for coronary artery disease (CAD), its downstream clinical impact is not established. In this study, the association of findings on CCTA with subsequent treatment and control of CAD risk factors was assessed in 208 consecutive symptomatic outpatients without known CAD who underwent CCTA. Blood pressure (BP), lipid levels, and CAD medications were compared before and after CCTA (mean follow-up period 8.1 +/- 6.6 months). CAD severity on CCTA was graded as absent, mild (1% to 49%), moderate (50% to 69%), or severe (> or =70%) stenosis. In patients with absent, mild, moderate, and severe CAD on CCTA, aspirin was initiated in 0%, 14%, 36%, and 15%; statins were initiated or increased in 4%, 23%, 44%, and 42% of patients; and BP medications were initiated or increased in 16%, 10%, 26%, and 38% of patients (p <0.05 for severe vs no CAD for all). Higher grades of CAD severity were independently associated with greater post-CCTA use of aspirin (odds ratio 3.2 per grade, p <0.001) and statins (odds ratio 3.6 per grade, p <0.001), but not BP medications. Greater CAD severity was independently associated with lower post-test total cholesterol (-8.2 mg/dl per grade, p = 0.02), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-6.8 mg/dl per grade, p = 0.04), and diastolic BP (-1.4 mm Hg per grade, p = 0.03), but not systolic BP. In conclusion, greater CAD severity on CCTA is associated with enhanced medical treatment and improved control of CAD risk factors.

publication date

  • October 2009

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.05.024

PubMed ID

  • 19766749

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 873

end page

  • 7

volume

  • 104

number

  • 7