Assessment of clinical improvement and quality of life before and after tonsillectomy. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Absenteeism
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Female
  • Health Status
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Office Visits
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Questionnaires
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Treatment Outcome

MeSH Major

  • Quality of Life
  • Tonsillectomy
  • Tonsillitis

abstract

  • To assess clinical improvement and quality of life measures in patients who had undergone tonsillectomy for recurrent acute and chronic tonsillitis between March 2004 and March 2005. A retrospective survey of all adults and children who had undergone tonsillectomy for recurrent acute and chronic tonsillitis. Patients were asked to compare their symptoms for the 12-month period before and after tonsillectomy. A review of 100 patients revealed that, following tonsillectomy: their days off work (or school) due to sore throat reduced by 95.3 per cent (from a mean of 27.6 to 1.3 days; confidence intervals 89.7 and 99.6 per cent); their visits to their general practitioner due to sore throat reduced by 95.6 per cent (from a mean of 7.9 to 0.4 visits; confidence intervals 93.8 and 95.1 per cent); and more than 90 per cent reported improved feelings of well-being, general health and energy. We conclude that tonsillectomy is of benefit for patients with recurrent acute and chronic tonsillitis. Tonsillectomy significantly reduced general practitioner attendances and resulted in an improved feeling of health and well-being.

publication date

  • February 2009

has subject area

  • Absenteeism
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Female
  • Health Status
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Office Visits
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Quality of Life
  • Questionnaires
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Tonsillectomy
  • Tonsillitis
  • Treatment Outcome

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1017/S0022215108002600

PubMed ID

  • 18492313

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 199

end page

  • 202

volume

  • 123

number

  • 2