Diurnal cortisol amplitude and fronto-limbic activity in response to stressful stimuli. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Behavior
  • Brain Mapping
  • Circadian Rhythm
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Photic Stimulation
  • Reaction Time
  • September 11 Terrorist Attacks

MeSH Major

  • Frontal Lobe
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Limbic System
  • Stress, Psychological

abstract

  • The development and exacerbation of many psychiatric and neurologic conditions are associated with dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis as measured by aberrant levels of cortisol secretion. Here we report on the relationship between the amplitude of diurnal cortisol secretion, measured across 3 typical days in 18 healthy individuals, and blood oxygen level dependant (BOLD) response in limbic fear/stress circuits, elicited by in-scanner presentation of emotionally negative stimuli, specifically, images of the World Trade Center (WTC) attack. Results indicate that subjects who secrete a greater amplitude of cortisol diurnally demonstrate less brain activation in limbic regions, including the amygdala and hippocampus/parahippocampus, and hypothalamus during exposure to traumatic WTC-related images. Such initial findings can begin to link our understanding, in humans, of the relationship between the diurnal amplitude of a hormone integral to the stress response, and those neuroanatomical regions that are implicated as both modulating and being modulated by that response.

publication date

  • June 2009

has subject area

  • Adult
  • Behavior
  • Brain Mapping
  • Circadian Rhythm
  • Female
  • Frontal Lobe
  • Humans
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Limbic System
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Photic Stimulation
  • Reaction Time
  • September 11 Terrorist Attacks
  • Stress, Psychological

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC4250041

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2008.11.011

PubMed ID

  • 19135805

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 694

end page

  • 704

volume

  • 34

number

  • 5