Mechanisms underlying mutually exclusive expression of virulence genes by malaria parasites. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Animals
  • Gene Silencing
  • In Situ Hybridization
  • Promoter Regions, Genetic
  • Protozoan Proteins
  • Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Virulence

MeSH Major

  • Malaria, Falciparum
  • Plasmodium falciparum
  • Transcription, Genetic

abstract

  • A fundamental yet poorly understood aspect of gene regulation in eukaryotic organisms is the mechanisms that control allelic exclusion and mutually exclusive gene expression. In the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, this process regulates expression of the var gene family--a large, hypervariable repertoire of genes that are responsible for the ability of the parasite to evade the host immune system and for pathogenesis of the disease. A central problem in understanding this process concerns the mechanisms that limit expression to a single gene at a time. Here, we describe results that provide information on the mechanisms that control silencing and single gene expression and differentiate between several models that have recently been proposed. The results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, supporting the existence of a postulated var-specific, subnuclear expression site and also reinforce the conclusion that var gene regulation is based on cooperative interactions between the two promoters of each var gene.

publication date

  • October 2007

has subject area

  • Animals
  • Gene Silencing
  • In Situ Hybridization
  • Malaria, Falciparum
  • Plasmodium falciparum
  • Promoter Regions, Genetic
  • Protozoan Proteins
  • Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Transcription, Genetic
  • Virulence

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC2002552

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1038/sj.embor.7401063

PubMed ID

  • 17762879

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 959

end page

  • 965

volume

  • 8

number

  • 10