Proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma with elevated serum CA 125: Report of a case with CA 125 immunoreactivity Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • CA-125 Antigen
  • Pelvic Neoplasms
  • Sarcoma
  • Soft Tissue Neoplasms

abstract

  • Proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma is a recently described rare soft tissue neoplasm. It is commonly found in the pelvic, perineal, and genital areas in middle-aged or older adults, as compared with the classic type of epithelioid sarcoma, which arises in the distal portion of the extremities in adolescents and young adults. Proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma has a more aggressive clinical behavior than the classic type of epithelioid sarcoma. Proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma is histologically characterized by a diffuse proliferation of epithelioid cells with prominent rhabdoid feature. Recently, a few cases have been reported of epithelioid sarcoma with elevated serum CA 125 level and CA 125 immunoreactivity in neoplastic cells. These cases raise the possibility that serum CA 125 and CA 125 immunoreactivity could be a useful tumor marker for diagnosing and monitoring epithelioid sarcoma. We describe a case of proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma with elevated serum CA 125 level (up to 3395 U/mL [reference range, <35 U/mL]) in a 12-year-old girl who presented with a huge pelvic mass measuring 12 cm in greatest dimension. The serum CA 125 level dropped to 452 U/mL after a debulking operation of the mass. Immunostaining for CA 125 demonstrated a positive immunoreactivity in the neoplastic cells. She received one cycle of chemotherapy and died of the disease 2 months after diagnosis. This case represented a rare example of proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma with elevated serum CA 125 and immunoreactivity for CA 125 in the tumor cells. Based on the previous reported cases and the current case, serum CA 125 as well as immunohistochemical stain for CA 125 may be a useful tumor marker of proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma.

publication date

  • June 2006

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed ID

  • 16740043

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 871

end page

  • 4

volume

  • 130

number

  • 6