Comparison of mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in coronary artery disease patients with versus without left ventricular dysfunction Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Coronary Disease
  • Myocardial Ischemia
  • Stress, Psychological
  • Ventricular Dysfunction, Left

abstract

  • To examine the susceptibility to myocardial ischemia with mental stress in patients who have coronary artery disease and normal left ventricular (LV) function versus those who have impaired LV function, we examined 58 patients who had coronary artery disease, including 22 who had normal LV function (ejection fraction >/=50%), 16 who had mild to moderate LV dysfunction (ejection fraction 30% to 50%), and 20 who had severe LV dysfunction (ejection fraction 3. At comparable double products across the 3 groups, ischemia was induced with mental stress more frequently in patients who had severe LV dysfunction (50%) than in those who had normal LV function (9%; p <0.01). The frequency of exercise-induced ischemia was different only between those who had mild/moderate LV dysfunction and those who had normal LV function (56% vs 18%, respectively, p <0.05). The pattern of mental stress versus exercise ischemia differed between groups (p <0.02): there was a higher prevalence of mental stress ischemia versus exercise ischemia in patients who had severe LV dysfunction (p = 0.06), a marginally higher prevalence of exercise versus mental stress ischemia in those who had moderate LV dysfunction (p = 0.07), and no difference in mental stress versus exercise ischemia in those who had normal LV function. Thus, at comparable double products during mental stress and similar extent of coronary artery disease, ischemia with mental stress was induced more frequently in patients who had severe LV dysfunction than in those who had normal LV function. These data suggest that mental stress ischemia may be of particular clinical importance in patients who have coronary artery disease and LV dysfunction.

publication date

  • February 2005

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.09.027

PubMed ID

  • 15670538

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 322

end page

  • 6

volume

  • 95

number

  • 3