Racial/ethnic differences in screening for colon cancer: report from the New York Cancer Project. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • New York
  • Prospective Studies
  • Questionnaires
  • Risk Factors

MeSH Major

  • Colonic Neoplasms
  • Ethnic Groups
  • Mass Screening

abstract

  • To determine whether racial/ethnic differences in colon cancer screening are independent of socioeconomic and personal risk factors. Baseline cross-section for a prospective cohort. We recruited adults between 2000 and 2002 to undergo a questionnaire and venipuncture to study cancer risks. Among 5595 adults over 50 years old, 40.3% reported sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy within the prior five years; rates were 48.0% for Whites, 32.8% for Blacks, 27.9% for Hispanics, 30.3% for Asians, and 33.3% for others. Adjusting for age, gender, access to care (as income and insurance), and risk profile (as cancer in family, smoking, and obesity), Blacks and Hispanics were less likely to have been screened than Whites. Screening for colon cancer is low, especially among racial/ethnic minorities. Sociocultural factors merit closer attention.

publication date

  • 2005

has subject area

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Colonic Neoplasms
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Ethnic Groups
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Mass Screening
  • Middle Aged
  • New York
  • Prospective Studies
  • Questionnaires
  • Risk Factors

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed ID

  • 15720052

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 76

end page

  • 83

volume

  • 15

number

  • 1