Stress-induced changes in skin barrier function in healthy women. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adolescent
  • Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
  • Adult
  • Epinephrine
  • Exercise
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Interleukin-1
  • Interleukin-10
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Killer Cells, Natural
  • Norepinephrine
  • Sleep Deprivation
  • Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
  • beta-Endorphin

MeSH Major

  • Skin Physiological Phenomena
  • Stress, Psychological

abstract

  • Despite clear exacerbation of several skin disorders by stress, the effect of psychologic or exertional stress on human skin has not been well studied. We investigated the effect of three different stressors, psychologic interview stress, sleep deprivation, and exercise, on several dermatologic measures: transepidermal water loss, recovery of skin barrier function after tape stripping, and stratum corneum water content (skin conductance). We simultaneously measured the effects of stress on plasma levels of several stress-response hormones and cytokines, natural killer cell activity, and absolute numbers of peripheral blood leukocytes. Twenty-five women participated in a laboratory psychologic interview stress, 11 women participated in one night of sleep deprivation, and 10 women participated in a 3 d exercise protocol. The interview stress caused a delay in the recovery of skin barrier function, as well as increases in plasma cortisol, norepinephrine, interleukin-1beta and interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and an increase in circulating natural killer cell activity and natural killer cell number. Sleep deprivation also decreased skin barrier function recovery and increased plasma interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and natural killer cell activity. The exercise stress did not affect skin barrier function recovery, but caused an increase in natural killer cell activity and circulating numbers of both cytolytic T lymphocytes and helper T cells. In addition, cytokine responses to the interview stress were inversely correlated with changes in barrier function recovery. These results suggest that acute psychosocial and sleep deprivation stress disrupts skin barrier function homeostasis in women, and that this disruption may be related to stress-induced changes in cytokine secretion.

publication date

  • August 2001

has subject area

  • Adolescent
  • Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
  • Adult
  • Epinephrine
  • Exercise
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Interleukin-1
  • Interleukin-10
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Killer Cells, Natural
  • Norepinephrine
  • Skin Physiological Phenomena
  • Sleep Deprivation
  • Stress, Psychological
  • Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
  • beta-Endorphin

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1046/j.1523-1747.2001.01373.x

PubMed ID

  • 11511309

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 309

end page

  • 317

volume

  • 117

number

  • 2