Monoclonal antibodies to mammalian heat shock proteins impair mouse embryo development in vitro Academic Article Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • DNA
  • Genome-Wide Association Study
  • Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques
  • Premature Birth
  • Specimen Handling

abstract

  • Two-cell mouse embryos (B6D2F1) were cultured in the presence or absence of 100 microg/ml monoclonal antibodies specific for the mammalian 60 kDa (HSP60), 70 kDa (HSP70) and 90 kDa (HSP90) heat shock proteins. Embryo development was evaluated after 3, 5 and 7 days in culture by determining the number of blastocysts, hatched blastocysts and outgrown trophoblasts at the successive time points. At day 3, only 29% (22/75) of the embryos cultured with anti-HSP60 antibody developed to the blastocyst stage (P < 0.0001) as compared to 67% (31/46) of the embryos cultured with anti-HSP70, 72% (43/60) cultured with anti-HSP90, and 79% (49/62) in medium plus mouse IgG1. By day 5, hatched embryos were present in 28% (13/ 46) of the cultures containing anti-HSP70 (P < 0.0001), as opposed to 57% (34/60) containing anti-HSP90 and 73% (45/62) containing IgG1. At day 7, outgrown trophoblasts were observed in 9% (4/46) of cultures containing anti-HSP70 (P < 0.0001), 45% (27/60) containing anti-HSP90 (P < 0.01) and 66% (41/62) cultured in medium plus IgG1. Antibodies to different heat shock proteins exerted a detrimental effect on mouse embryo development at unique development stages. Immune sensitization to heat shock proteins may be a cause of reproductive failure.

publication date

  • June 6, 1998

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1093/humrep/13.4.987

PubMed ID

  • 9619559

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 987

end page

  • 90

volume

  • 13

number

  • 4