Applying a controlled medical terminology to a distributed, production clinical information system. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Computer Communication Networks
  • Computer Systems
  • Data Display
  • Humans

MeSH Major

  • Hospital Information Systems
  • Information Storage and Retrieval
  • Medical Records Systems, Computerized
  • Vocabulary, Controlled

abstract

  • To maximize the value of computerized medical records systems, an organizing structure is needed. That structure can be provided by a controlled medical terminology (CMT). At Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, we have been employing a controlled medical terminology, our Medical Entities Dictionary (MED), to mediate the storage and retrieval of patient data and enable decision support applications. This paper describes how the MED is actually used for data management in our distributed clinical information systems environment. Our system tools which access the MED for production purposes facilitate the mapping of terms from many sources to a uniform representation of concepts and also return information about the relationships between concepts. Applications which access a CMT for production purposes should be optimized for performance in high volume settings, fault tolerant, synchronizable, extensible, portable, and maintainable. We briefly describe our system architecture and then demonstrate how we utilize the MED for translation and semantic information as data is moved into and out of our patient database. We discuss our current tools and present a preview of the next generation of applications which will manage access to the MED for our production systems.

publication date

  • 1995

has subject area

  • Computer Communication Networks
  • Computer Systems
  • Data Display
  • Hospital Information Systems
  • Humans
  • Information Storage and Retrieval
  • Medical Records Systems, Computerized
  • Vocabulary, Controlled

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed Central ID

  • PMC2579127

PubMed ID

  • 8563316

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 421

end page

  • 425