Comparison of left ventricular mass and geometry in black and white patients with essential hypertension Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • African Continental Ancestry Group
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Hypertension
  • Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular
  • Myocardium

abstract

  • To assess racial difference in cardiac responses to elevated blood pressure, we compared echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular (LV) mass and the wall thickness to chamber dimension ratio (relative wall thickness) in 380 white and 47 black patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension consecutively enrolled in echocardiographic research studies at The New York Hospital Hypertension Center. Diastolic blood pressure and weight were slightly greater in black as compared with white subjects (104 +/- 18 v 98 +/- 11 mm Hg; P = .014 and 82 +/- 17 v 77 +/- 15 kg; P = .037, respectively), however the groups were similar with respect to age, duration of hypertension, cholesterol level, cigarette smoking, past use of antihypertensive therapy, family history of heart disease, and height. On average, LV mass indexed for body surface area and relative wall thickness were significantly greater in blacks than whites (119 v 105 g/m2; P = .02 and 0.46 v 0.39; P = .003) and blacks had twice the prevalence of LV hypertrophy (41% v 19%; P < .001) or concentric remodeling (21% v 12%; P < .05). The magnitude of increased LV mass and relative wall thickness in blacks was similar in men (132 v 110 g/m2; P = .01 and 0.44 v 0.39; P = .04) and in women (107 v 94 g/m2; P = .11 and 0.48 v 0.39; P = .02). In multivariate analyses, systolic blood pressure, age, and race were consistently predictors of increased LV mass and abnormal cardiac geometry. Cholesterol level was not independently associated with increased LV mass but was weakly associated with increased relative wall thickness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

publication date

  • October 1993

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed ID

  • 8267936

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 815

end page

  • 23

volume

  • 6

number

  • 10