CSF somatostatin in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Ambulatory Care
  • Arginine Vasopressin
  • Cognition Disorders
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Radioimmunoassay
  • Severity of Illness Index

MeSH Major

  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Somatostatin

abstract

  • Because the central administration of somatostatin to experimental animals produces behaviors with some similarities to the compulsions of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and because serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been reported to reduce brain content of somatostatin, the authors examined central somatostatin activity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. CSF for measurement of somatostatin was obtained from 15 drug-free outpatients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and 27 normal volunteers. The mean CSF somatostatin level was significantly higher in the patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder than in the normal subjects. Although the functional significance of this finding is unknown, these data are consistent with a role for somatostatin in the clinical symptomatology of obsessive-compulsive disorder and its response to neuropharmacological agents. The high levels of CSF somatostatin reported here in a patient subgroup whose predominant symptoms consisted of overly focused, perseverative thought processes are in contrast to the consistently low levels of CSF somatostatin seen in patients with a spectrum of disorders characterized by substantial cognitive deficits.

publication date

  • March 1993

has subject area

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Ambulatory Care
  • Arginine Vasopressin
  • Cognition Disorders
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Radioimmunoassay
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Somatostatin

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1176/ajp.150.3.460

PubMed ID

  • 8094599

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 460

end page

  • 464

volume

  • 150

number

  • 3