Phosphatidylethanolamine is the donor of the ethanolamine residue linking a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor to protein. Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH

  • Ethanolamine
  • Ethanolamines
  • Genes, Fungal
  • Glycosylphosphatidylinositols
  • Inositol
  • Lipid Bilayers
  • Mutagenesis

MeSH Major

  • Diacylglycerol Cholinephosphotransferase
  • Ethanolaminephosphotransferase
  • Glycolipids
  • Phosphatidylethanolamines
  • Phosphatidylinositols
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae

abstract

  • Numerous cell surface glycoproteins from eukaryotic organisms including African trypanosomes and budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), are anchored to the lipid bilayer by a glycophospholipid, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, covalently linked to the carboxyl terminus of the protein via a phosphoethanolamine bridge. In this paper we describe metabolic labeling experiments aimed at identifying the biosynthetic origin of the ethanolamine residue in the phosphoethanolamine bridge. Using yeast mutants generated by disruption of the ethanolaminephosphotransferase (EPT1) and cholinephosphotransferase (CPT1) genes, we report data consistent with the proposal that the ethanolamine residue is derived from phosphatidylethanolamine.

publication date

  • August 5, 1992

has subject area

  • Diacylglycerol Cholinephosphotransferase
  • Ethanolamine
  • Ethanolaminephosphotransferase
  • Ethanolamines
  • Genes, Fungal
  • Glycolipids
  • Glycosylphosphatidylinositols
  • Inositol
  • Lipid Bilayers
  • Mutagenesis
  • Phosphatidylethanolamines
  • Phosphatidylinositols
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Research

keywords

  • Journal Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed ID

  • 1322394

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 15277

end page

  • 15280

volume

  • 267

number

  • 22