Characteristics of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Haiti Academic Article uri icon

Overview

MeSH Major

  • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

abstract

  • To identify the characteristics of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) as it occurs in Haiti, we studied 61 previously healthy Haitians who had diagnoses of either Kaposi's sarcoma (15), opportunistic infections (45), or both (1) established in Haiti between June 1979 and October 1982. The first cases of Kaposi's sarcoma and opportunistic infections in Haiti were recognized in 1978-1979, a period that coincides with the earliest reports of AIDS in the United States. We do not believe that AIDS existed in Haiti before this period. The types of opportunistic infections and the clinical course in Haitians with Kaposi's sarcoma and opportunistic infections were similar in most aspects to those in patients with AIDS in the United States. The median age of Haitians with Kaposi's sarcoma and opportunistic infections was 32 years, and 85 per cent were men. The interval between diagnosis and death was six months in 80 per cent of the patients. Diarrhea was the most common reason for seeking medical attention in patients with opportunistic infections. Lymphopenia and skin-test anergy were observed in 86 and 100 per cent of patients, respectively. Potential risk factors (bisexual activity or blood transfusions) were identified in 17 per cent of male and 22 per cent of female patients. Demographic information suggests that patients belonged to all socioeconomic strata of Haitian society.

publication date

  • December 4, 1983

Research

keywords

  • Academic Article

Identity

Language

  • eng

PubMed ID

  • 6621622

Additional Document Info

start page

  • 945

end page

  • 50

volume

  • 309

number

  • 16